Tuesday, November 9, 2010

Polish National Anthem

Mazurek Dąbrowskiego (Polish pronunciation: [maˈzurɛɡ dɔmbrɔfˈskʲɛɡɔ], "Dąbrowski's Mazurka") is the national anthem of Poland. It is also known by its original title, Pieśń Legionów Polskich we Włoszech ([pʲɛɕɲ lɛˈɡʲɔnuf ˈpɔlskiɣ vɛˈvwɔʂɛx], "Song of the Polish Legions in Italy"), or by its incipitJeszcze Polska nie zginęła ([ˈjɛʂt͡ʂɛ ˈpɔlska ɲɛzɡiˈnɛwa], "Poland Is Not Yet Lost" or "Poland Has Not Yet Perished").

The song is a lively mazurka with lyrics penned by Józef Wybicki in Reggio nell'EmiliaCisalpine Republic (now in Italy), around 16 July 1797, two years after the Third Partition of Polanderased the once vast country from the map. It was originally meant to boost the morale of Polish soldiers serving under General Jan Henryk Dąbrowski in the Polish Legions, which were part of the French Revolutionary Army led by General Napoléon Bonaparte in its conquest of Italy. The mazurka, expressing the idea that the nation of Poland, despite lack of political independence, had not disappeared as long as the Polish people were still alive and fighting in its name, soon became one of the most popular patriotic songs in Poland.

The song's popularity led to a plethora of variations, sung by Polish patriots on different occasions. It also inspired other peoples struggling for independence during the 19th century. One of the songs strongly influenced by Poland Is Not Yet Lost is Hey Slavs, a former national anthem of Yugoslavia. When Poland re-emerged as an independent state in 1918, Mazurek Dąbrowskiego became its de facto anthem. It was officially adopted as the national anthem of the Republic of Poland in 1926.


 

English Translation

Poland has not perished yet
So long as we still live
That which alien force has seized
We at 
sabrepoint shall retrieve

March, march, Dąbrowski

From Italy to Poland

Under thy command

Let us now rejoin the nation

Cross the Vistula and Warta
And Poles we shall be
We've been shown by Bonaparte
Ways to victory

March, march...

Like Czarniecki to Poznań
After Swedish occupation,
To rescue our homeland
We shall return by sea

March, march...

Father, in tears
Says to his Basia
Just listen, it seems that our people
Are beating the drums

March, march...

No comments:

Post a Comment